FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

This page is a collection of many questions which have been brought to us time and time again covering the more common problems associated with the fish keeping hobby. However, if you do not find the answer to your particular problem please feel free to contact our technical support team. We will endeavour to answer your questions as swiftly and efficiently as possible. More questions asked by consumers will be published to the website from time to time to help other people whom maybe experiencing the same problems. if you do not wish to have your question published please tell us when emailing.

 

Q: I am looking to set up a small cold water tank with some small goldfish and the odd plant; I am planning on using my tap water to fill this aquarium. How do I know that this water will be suitable for my fish?

Q:
Would you advise that all fish tanks have some form of filtration, and what is the main purpose of a filter?

Q: Do I necessarily need lighting for my fish tank?

Q: I am looking to set up a Tropical tank, having kept cold water fish for some time I fancied a change to the tropical set up, I am aware that these fish need warm water to survive however because there are so many different fish available I am unsure what the correct temperature is to keep all these fish happy.

Q: I have just bought a new Aqua One tank and have set it up straight away. How soon can I add fish?

Q: How much food do I need to feed my fish and how often?

Q: How often should I perform water changes on my tank and how do I know when this becomes necessary

Q: I have a constant algae problem in my tank. I have been told that there are certain fish that will help reduce this. I this true?

Q: I have seen air pumps used in many Aquaria. How important is it to have one present in my tropical tank? Or are they simple used for aesthetical purposes?

Q: I am looking to set up a new tropical tank with a variety of different tetra and community fish. I wish to keep plants but in the past have had problems keeping them alive. Can you advise on some successful methods to make plants flourish in my new tropical aquarium.

Q: I am looking to set up a small cold water tank with some small goldfish and the odd plant; I am planning on using my tap water to fill this aquarium. How do I know that this water will be suitable for my fish?

 

A: For most cold water fish, especially gold fish, the water which comes from our taps is usually quite close to being suitable for the fish. However, tap water , if on a mains supply, will contain varying levels of chlorine depending on the location. This chlorine can be toxic to fish but it can easily be reduced or removed from the system by using a dechlorinating agent like Aqua One Water Conditioner. Chlorine also has the ability to burn off at surface level, once the aquarium is filled with water. Therefore, we would advise to leave the filled aquarium for a couple of weeks without fish but with the filter running. Add the dechlorinaters during this period.

At the end of this period test the water with a test kit which is available from all specialist aquatic retailers or take a water sample to your local aquatics shop for professional testing.

 

Q: Would you advise that all fish tanks have some form of filtration, and what is the main purpose of a filter?

 

A: Fish in their natural environment will generally live in much larger bodies of water where waste matter, produced by the fish, is immediately diluted and washed away by the sheer volume of water. Nature then breaks it down into a non-toxic form in a whole host of different biological processes.

This is not possible in a conventional fish tank due to the lack of water and space in relation to the amount and size of fishing living in it. This is where a filtration system becomes vital for the health and welfare of your fish. A filter is designed to remove all forms of fish waste both liquid and solid.

Therefore, we strongly recommend that all fish aquaria should have some form of filtration. Aqua One offers a wide variety of different filters from small hang on filter, to internal filter, trough to the larger external canister filters as well as our wet and dry trickle filtration system that is incorporated in many of our medium sized tanks. They are all designed in one way or another to clear the water by means of mechanical, biological and/or chemical filtration processes and hence to prolong the time between water changes. For further information on water quality please refer to our Guide to Water Quality on this website.

 

 

Q: Do I necessarily need lighting for my fish tank?

 

A: Effective lighting not only enables you to view the contents of your aquarium, but it also enhances the colour of fish, plants and invertebrates providing greater visual appeal. Inappropriate lighting may not only have a direct effect on the welfare of plants and corals, but may also impact the health of certain fish.

The health of many species is directly related to the quality and quantity of light they receive. They use the energy from lighting as a means of powering photosynthesis on which their health depends. Those that  concern us most are the microscopic symbiotic algae, or zooxanthellae, which inhabit the tissues of many marine corals, and the tropical aquatic plants that we grow in our freshwater aquariums. Improper lighting may lead to a range of health and other problems. For more detailed information on lighting and lighting options please refer to our Guide to Lighting Options .

 

 

Q: I am looking to set up a Tropical tank, having kept cold water fish for some time I fancied a change to the tropical set up, I am aware that these fish need warm water to survive however because there are so many different fish available I am unsure what the correct temperature is to keep all these fish happy.

 

A: Indeed all Tropical fish require warmer water then their cold water friends. Most tropical fish will be fine kept in water around 22-24 degrees. All tropical tanks shoud be equipped with a suitable heater. Aqua One heaters are available in either glass or stainless steel. These heaters come with a built-in thermostats and can be regulated to the correct temperatures depending on the fish species you are keeping.

However, always consult your specialist aquatic retailer when purchasing your fish what temperature they should be kept at and that that is the same for all the different species you are keeping in your tank!

 

 

Q: I have just bought a new Aqua One tank and have set it up straight away. How soon can I add fish?

 

A: All new tanks will require to be left running for a period of time before adding fish to the system. This allows the water and the filter to prepare for the arrival of the fish. We would advise that cold water tanks are left for around 1 week running with no fish, tropical tanks are left for 2 weeks running before adding any fish. During this time the filter will mature and build up the vital bacteria required to break down the fish waste. This period of time can be accelerated by using a filter starter or filling the aquarium with RO water (Reverse Osmosis) available from your retailer.

 

 

Q: How much food do I need to feed my fish and how often?

 

A: When feeding your fish you should only feed as much food as the fish can consume in any two minute period. Once feeding has been completed there should be no food left on the surface of the water or floating around in the tank. If you find there is food floating around then you are feeding too much. Ideally, you want to feed your fish 3-4 times a day with small quantities to avoid wastage.

 

 

Q: How often should I perform water changes on my tank and how do I know when this becomes necessary

 

A: Water changes are essential in all aquariums. The easiest way to tell when a water change is required is by using a test kit. Test kits check the water quality. When the test begins to show that the water quality is beginning to deteriorate within the aquarium then this is a sign that a water change is required. Familiarising yourself with a water test kit is an essential part of all fish keeping. Never change more than 10% of the overall amount of water in one go because the sudden change in water quality and temperature could have a detrimental effect on the health of your fish!

 

 

Q: I have a constant algae problem in my tank. I have been told that there are certain fish that will help reduce this. I this true?

 

A: Indeed there are a variety of different fish species which will, to a certain extent, clean the insides of the aquariums by eating the algae on the glass. The Plecostimus (Pleco), which ar tropical fish, are the most commonly used fish for this job. They are relatively inexpensive and are also very hardy little fish, which can be kept in numbers and are compatible with many other tropical fish species.

Sometimes there are outsides influences that encourage extensive algae growth. Please check that your aquarium is not exposed to excessive sunlight. Also, running your lighting for more than the recommended period per day (8-10 hours) will unnecessarily promote greater algae growth. The underlying problem is most likely a high nitrate level which can be addressed by changes to the filtration system or your maintenance of the filter. We would recommend that you discuss this with your retailer as excessive nitrate levels can be harmful to your fish.

 

 

Q: I have seen air pumps used in many Aquaria. How important is it to have one present in my tropical tank? Or are they simple used for aesthetical purposes?

A: An air pump is certainly a very useful addition to any tank whether it be a coldwater, tropical or marine set up. Air pumps such as the Aqua One SR or HP range provide large amounts of dissolved oxygen for the tank, as the bubbles break on the surface. This process is vital for the fish, plants and other living organism, delivering the oxygen they require to breath. Besides this, they produce a very decorative feature within the tank, with air bubbling through plants, rocks or air operated ornaments.

 

Q: I am looking to set up a new tropical tank with a variety of different tetra and community fish. I wish to keep plants but in the past have had problems keeping them alive. Can you advise on some successful methods to make plants flourish in my new tropical aquarium.

 

A: Plants in a tropical aquarium can be quite difficult to keep. They require certain water quality parameters and high levels of nutrients to keep thriving in an aquarium. The health of many plant species, particularly the tropical aquatic plants that we grow in our freshwater aquariums, is directly related to the quality and quantity of light they receive. They use the energy from lighting as a means of powering photosynthesis on which their health depends. For more detailed information on lighting see our Guide to Lighting Options.

However, one of the most important aspects to keeping plants, which is often overlooked, the substrate. Tropical Plants gain 85% of their nutrients through their root structure.

When you set up a tropical tank it would be a good idea to purchase a heater cable to go underneath the substrate. The cable should be snaked along the bottom of the tank and held in place with suction cups. Spread your substrate over the top, preferably using sand type substrate like silica sand or silver sand. Gravel is a less preferred option.

With the sand substrate on top of heater cable, the sand has the ability to retain the heat which the heater cable will produce. The plants can then be pushed into the warm sand substrate. Because the sand substrate is warmed slightly the roots from the plants will be able to establish much quicker and stronger in a much shorter space of time.

This will improve the plants overall ability to retain the vital nutrients needed to grow.

There are also plant food supplements in the form of small tablets available. These can be pushed into the sand substrate were the warmth will break them down slightly quicker. The plants will then be able to benefit from these nutrients, due to their improved root structure.

Following the above tips, you should have very little problems in keeping plants with in you aquarium. This heater cable will plug into your mains supply,

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